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    • #2345
      adminadmin
      Keymaster

      In terms of how sustainable monolithic ideas about English are, I can confidently now say that in our globalized world they are not sustainable. It is unrealistic to expect that in a classroom in which the teacher is a “non-native” speaker and their students are Chinese, Mexican, Saudi Arabian, German, Dutch, French etc. everyone’s English will be the same, uniform and “standard”. And it would be quite boring if it were, wouldn’t it?

      It is still a struggle in classrooms in the US or the UK for instance, or in South Korea or China as well (some years ago schools in these countries were requiring that English teachers applying to teach there have a passport from an “English-speaking country” like US, UK, Australia etc. They might still be requiring this), because I think that even if one tried to teach a standardized form on English, it would not ‘come out’ as such in the majority of learners, but it still expected, especially in a highly academic context. And because teachers want their students to get into a US or UK university, they will teach the English needed for them to do so. I suppose one must always adapt to their context.

      With the ELT industry being so profitable, it is hard to imagine English varieties being totally accepted and taught in schools and universities, but I do hope that with the high number of NNS teachers and also different student needs, that this will change in time. Hard to imagine the big proficiency tests accommodating for local varieties though…thoughts on this?

      To view past replies go to: https://changingenglishes.proboards.com/thread/9/unit-1-reflections

      • This topic was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by adminadmin.
    • #3264
      Sahar AmerSahar Amer
      Member

      English is more like a galaxy than a planet Many people have a monolithic concept of English and other languages Linguists believe that monolithic concepts of language(s) are idealisations Monolithic concepts of English are associated with the rise of ‘Standard English’ Monolithic concepts of English developed for both social and cognitive reasons
      Rules can be seen as ‘regularities’ describing ‘actual’ usage

    • #3265
      Sahar AmerSahar Amer
      Member

      English is more like a galaxy than a planet Many people have a monolithic concept of English and other languages Linguists believe that monolithic concepts of language(s) are idealisations Monolithic concepts of English are associated with the rise of ‘Standard English’ Monolithic concepts of English developed for both social and cognitive reasons
      Rules can be seen as ‘regularities’ describing ‘actual’ usage

    • #3271

      English is one of the most popular languages in the world . People from different countries learn English as a second language to get a better job . It’s a global language . People have different concepts of English .

    • #3359

      While accepting the existence of different varieties/forms of English, it is also necessary to pay attention to the hegemonic power of the already established varieties of English which are considered to be the standard/legitimate varieties. It is difficult if not impossible to destabilize the hegemonic power of the so-termed standard varieties of English until these varieties are reinforced by the existing socio-economic and political structures. In view of this, which variety of English is to be taught in a classroom becomes more of a political choice rather than a linguistic one.

    • #3391

      In terms of how sustainable monolithic ideas about English are , I say that people are naturally different. We have different thoughts , ideas , beliefs , family background and cultures . Each one has a different style. Being an Egyptian English teacher , I do my best to help my students communicate in English with native speakers to master the target language . In Egypt , we have information schools , Experimental language schools and governmental schools. Students are taught English by non native speakers of English in governmental schools , but international schools employ teachers with a native passport . Not all students are the same , some students speak English the same way as a native speaker. We must admit that that the term sustainable seems boring .
      Moving to the standard English ,I do believe that it should be given due care for exams and professional career development . We need students to master the standard English to keep up to date with the 21 century .
      English is the most popular language all over the world . Millions of learners attempt to learn it for different reasons . Travelling abroad is the most important reason either to study in a European university or get a job . In Egypt most subjects in universities are taught in English , That’s why all Egyptians are eager to learn the English language .

    • #3429

      English is more like a galaxy than a planet , English is like a wheel go to oneplace to many places , no boundary its flexible.
      English is diversity language.

    • #3448

      English is more like a galaxy than a planet. English enables us to know customs and taditions of the western culture. It gives us the chance to meet people and commuicatice With them in English. It helps us to meet new people and make friends With them. We turn to a global citizen who can understand different culture and widen his scope of knowledge. Thanks to English, many doors will be opened infront of you to achieve your dreams.

    • #3796

      In this unit, I think English language is like a galaxy. As an English learner and teacher, we must know the standard English which can get good understanding to communicative each other. In classrooms of non native speakers always get confused with the British and American English. Students always argue about that. Last, being a English teacher, we must know exactly what are the structure words and content words.

    • #4059

      ” It is unrealistic to expect that in a classroom in which the teacher is a “non-native” speaker and their students are Chinese, Mexican, Saudi Arabian, German, Dutch, French etc. everyone’s English will be the same, uniform and “standard”. And it would be quite boring if it were, wouldn’t it?”

      How I love this! Indeed! Teaching English would be dull if we just stick with monolithic English. I am amazed how dynamic English language is! Every language educator must remember that we are teaching diverse students with different English level. Our teaching approach must vary. It would be better if we teach the language based on its need (English for Specific Purposes).

    • #4107

      Varieties of English can be encouraged by English Language teachers in their classrooms around the world unless they teach to face some standard examination at the end of the course. Recognition given or gained by a particular variety gives the learners a kind of inclusiveness in the language identity so that they learn the language with confidence and enthusiasm polishing up fluency reaching proficiency at a certain stage in the language learning cycle.

    • #4192

      The arguments supporting pluralithic view of English are undeniable and I fully support such point of view. Nevertheless, it is quite scary for me as a teacher due to the fact it touches the very foundations of the teaching methodology and there are not many resources that could guide teachers in this new reality. On the surface everything is clear but the devil is in the details and it’s hard to conclude what specific teaching techniques should be used to prepare our students to participate in the global English communication.

    • #4205

      As a monolithic view, English has a standard rules that must be follow by the learner. This then define good and bad English, or standard or non standard English. In fact, language is dynamic and it changes, including English. As a lingua franca, English has made contact with different language and culture which then enrich the English language itself.

    • #4497
      Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
      Member

      The strength of a language, I can argue, can be found in the variations and different modes of usage that exist in its speech community. No one can pause or keep on hold the dynamism of language, it’s an inherent thing to this phenomenon. Monolithic view of the language may not be sustainable even in the UK. Can all the less than 500 million English NS become teachers to billions of NNS? This approach is not feasible looking at the current spread of the language.

    • #4683

      English is certainly plurilithic. There is no case for English being considered monolithic.

      The idea of Standard English is ingrained. The fact is that as a teacher I need to help students to work towards what Standard English is thought to be – in the written form in particular. I suppose a benefit is that a person who can achieve a high standard will be rewarded. However, this is often due to socioeconomic means rather than only hard work. The disadvantage is that so many are excluded despite being able to communicate effectively.

      I personally wonder if the idea of Standard English will not become even more entrenched due to intense competition among people around the world. Neoliberal ideas have meant an individuals must constantly improve their human capital (by themselves) to stay competitive. Sadly, the ‘haves’ will continue to control what is deemed acceptable.

    • #4685

      All languages are a galaxy rather than a planet, it’s just that the galaxy of English is expanding at a much greater rate. I think it’s folly to expect there to be one kind of English (or one kind of Spanish, French, German, etc.) While I think the role of a native English speaker as teacher remains important, there should never be a rule that states one can only learn real English from a native speaker. I feel that seeking a native speaker as teacher becomes more important if the learner wants to work on using more “sophisticated” English, but that may only be useful for those seeking a higher degree at an English speaking university.

      I do feel that “standard English” is also very difficult to define when we have so many countries out there that use English as their main language, and their use of the language can vary widely. Just looking at the U.S. versus the U.K. and the divide between the users of each language is evidence enough. For starters, Americans reformed the spelling over a hundred years ago, and the U.S. spelling leaks over the border to Canada on occasion. There are also bits of idiomatic language that can confuse speakers and learners who cross borders.

    • #4688

      “English” is more like a galaxy rather than a planet. Therefore, English is plurilithic. It has more standard varieties, non-standard varieties in addition to the Standard British English and Standard American English. For instance, “Standard English” has to be measured with a set of rules and regulations. For instance, there are standard English varieties in the world, such as Standard Sri Lankan English, Standard Indian English, Standard Canadian English and etc.

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