Home Forums Reflection Forum Reflection 2.2 – Translanguaging

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    • #2349
      adminadmin
      Keymaster

      I find the concept of translanguaging fascinating, and an equitable way of showing respect towards heritage languages while at the same time teaching English. However, it seems to be quite controversial still. Some questions:

      1. Is translanguaging recommended and possible in ELT contexts in which international students study English in the US or UK (for example) in institutions where there is an “English only” policy for classrooms?

      2. How can one effectively apply translanguaging to a classroom of mixed L1s (as opposed to all Spanish-speaking for instance)? I understand learning key phrases is a recommendation, but what exactly is a ‘key phrase’ from lesson to lesson, day to day? It seems challenging to learn key phrases in 7-8 different languages for the great number of lessons taught if you are a monolingual English teacher.

      3. Can/should traslanguaging be used in academic English contexts?

      To view past replies go to: https://changingenglishes.proboards.com/thread/13/translanguaging

      • This topic was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by adminadmin.
    • #3738

      sure traslanguaging can be used in academic English contexts?

    • #4086

      1. Is translanguaging recommended and possible in ELT contexts in which international students study English in the US or UK (for example) in institutions where there is an “English only” policy for classrooms?

      ANSWER: I think, it would be difficult for international students to be understood using translanguaging since they are in the Inner Circle. They would have to adhere to the school rules. Not only that, they need to consider the cultural differences too. I am not saying that since they are in Inner Circle, it means that there will be linguistic discrimination. But, it really depends with their professors as well. Of course, we still need to consider them.

      I don’t think “English only” is bad at all times especially if you want to develop someone’s fluency. The disadvantage of not applying this policy is that student may find it comfortable to use their mother tongue and will not express themselves in the English language anymore.

      2. How can one effectively apply translanguaging to a classroom of mixed L1s (as opposed to all Spanish-speaking for instance)? I understand learning key phrases is a recommendation, but what exactly is a ‘key phrase’ from lesson to lesson, day to day? It seems challenging to learn key phrases in 7-8 different languages for the great number of lessons taught if you are a monolingual English teacher.

      ANSWER: Using examples would do. As long as the English language teacher is using words that the learners would understand, I think it would be much better.

      3. Can/should translanguaging be used in academic English contexts?

      ANSWER: As long as it doesn’t compromise the real meaning of statements and if there’s an explanation next to it (for those who don’t know the terms used) , it’s all right for me. What matters most is that the readers or the listeners would understand what the writer or speaker wants to say.

    • #4212

      Sometimes translanguaging can possibly hinder encouraging of using standard variety but it produces an enriched version of English in bilingual or multilingual classrooms.
      Code switching and mixing are very productive not only in classrooms but also in social scenarios may be sometimes depicting social class, ethnicity or speakers’ educational background.
      When a teacher encourages mainly the target language: English and all other possible vernaculars the learners get some confidence and a sense of identity and in return they enhance their ESL.

    • #4220

      Translanguaging is very common in communication, esppecially in multilingual society, soemtimes it’s very important to do code switching or mixing not only to deliver effective message but also to build relationship and to show expression. In teaching English, I sometimes do code mixing and code switching to connect to mmy students. It helps a lot, especially in speaking class.

    • #4532
      Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
      Member

      Do you see any difference between code mixing/switching and translanguaging? How effective has the translanguaging method proved to be?

    • #4716

      In Sri Lanka, the concept of translanguaging is occupying in the ESL classroom context. Though code-switching is restricted in the ESL classroom, in order to go for a better understanding of the English language (L2 language), there is a language shift between Sinhala (L1) and English (L2), then Tamil (L1) and English (L2).

      Is it possible to learn L2 language without any code switching with L1 language? If so, what will be the best strategies for learn L2 language in a classroom without mixing L1 language?

    • #4749

      Where I teach, we only allow English in the classroom, but the students often go in and out of their native language outside the classroom, and they do tend to “group up” according to their language groups when they socialize.

      There are rare occasions where a friendship is formed between two students who don’t speak the same L1 and those seem to be the best friendships because their language skills tend to improve more quickly that those of the students who spend all of their time outside of class in the same L1 group. They also do learn different expressions in other L1 languages which is funny to hear about as an instructor. Of course, it’s usually all the “dirty” words they learn, but it’s translanguaging still, right?

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