Home Forums Reflection Forum Reflection 5.1 – Make language your own

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    • #2745
      adminadmin
      Keymaster

      I love this idea of making language one’s own, and I liked this exchange in which the teachers arrived at this conclusion.
      I think there could be forums for students to share their local experiences. In an online medium perhaps actual forums, discussion boards like this one, blogs, or even vlogs on YouTube channels could be created and used for students from all sorts of different learning contexts to share their experiences. This could start as a simple class task, guided by the teacher initially and let evolve and grow through the student voices.
      In a recent conference, two teachers in different US cities and states presented their project wherein they set up Google Slides presentations/videos with their respective students and then paired or grouped their students with each other across geographical constraints to work on their student-created videos, using topics that focused on them, their culture etc. I liked that and it could grow in scale and scope.
      In one school I worked with where students came from tens of different cultures, we hosted a yearly International Day where students recreated their country/culture in their classroom using means like traditional food, games, music, pictures and videos of their countries, recreating important landmarks, offering mini language classes etc. They talked about their culture and their countries and their language to everyone visiting using English (their English) and it was always a wonderful result. This could be adapted to include ways of raising their awareness about language learning, somewhat like the collaborative forum discussed in the course.
      This is a challenging question…does anyone have other views/ideas?

      To view past replies go to: https://changingenglishes.proboards.com/thread/25/make-language-own

      • This topic was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by adminadmin.
    • #3751

      It is importance to be able to talk about their own culture in English. No matter where tourists come from, English will always be the lingua franca we have been talking about in this course.

    • #4619

      The idea of making English our own sounds far more pragmatic than trying to standardize being monolithic.
      For example, here in Sri Lanka, lots of ‘foreignness’ is associated in teaching ESL where apples, for example are rarely grown but ‘Tom eats an apple every day ‘ is what you find in textbooks. Obviously, the distance is felt here, making the leaner feel it’s the others’ language.
      So, the language should be authentic to its cultural contexts so that it becomes our own.

    • #4660
      Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
      Member

      English has become ours, we speak about us in it, we talk about our relationships and cultures. For example in Nigeria a cousin is called either cousin brother or cousin sister or more so a brother or sister. What I am trying to say is that the language has been made our son.
      The forum I feel students can talk to themselves is more or less through groups and clubs. Many African countries may not have a readily available internet and computer access, as such blogs and all the e forums may not serve the general population. But where they are available they would be of great help

    • #4731

      Language and culture go together. Even I did speak in standard English but the one whom I communicate with was not able to understand what I said, then it is useless.

      It is also important for us, teachers, to expose our students to varieties of English and lay down explanation if they would ask questions about it since it depends on the contexts.

    • #4795

      A language has a set of native speakers. It is generally agreed that a standard of a language is maintained by the native speakers of that particular language. English language is originally owned by the speakers of the inner circle. The people who live in UK and USA. Furthermore, they are considered as the “proficient” speakers in that particular language due to their usage of the pronunciation. Therefore, I believe the whole property of a language is owned by that particular native speakers. But still, English language is owned by the whole world because it dominates the life of the global citizens and it has become to a global language. Every global citizen tends to be competent in English language. Therefore, it is necessary for the global citizens to make the language own. In Sri Lanka, there is “Standard Sri Lankan English.” It is a variety of English. In other words, this variety of English exists as a standard form of English in Sri Lanka which has prominent features of first languages of Sri Lankans. The first languages of Sri Lanka are Sinhalese and Tamil. For instances; Exclamation terms, “Budu Ammoh, Kadavuleh, then question tags, “you are going there neh?” Here, the question tag of “neh”, furthermore, some food items and clothes names; “Kavum, Kokis, Kiribath, Osariya, Hawadiya and etc.”

    • #4844

      I love the idea of making the whole language one’s own! Even if you teach students the most perfectly standardized correct English, they’ll go home and use the language how they like. I think as long as they are communicating what they want to, and they are being understood by the listener or reader, they’re doing great!

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