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  • in reply to: Unit 5 Reflection #4664
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    TESOL and other national and international English language bodies should call for conferences and more workshops that relate to plurilithic concept of teaching and learning the language.
    In Nigeria and particularly among my colleagues, we will do as much as possible to create the awareness more and more. The social media is also a veritable tool for such tasks.
    When the awareness starts to sink into the minds of teachers, learners, parent and the public; it won’t be difficult to convince policy makers and have policies that favour this concept of teaching English and owning it.

    in reply to: Discussion 5.2 – Problems of public belief about English #4663
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    The status and prestige accorded English spoken by any white skinned person is a problem in my contexts. Many people don’t have the idea that the NS English has its own variations and standard. So they target the so called standard English by proxy, with attempts that make them appear fake.

    in reply to: Discussion 5.1 – Local Intelligence #4662
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    In Nigeria experts are usually involved in the curriculum development though some times it comes with politics. But not much has been done recently on English language, it is still the monolithic conception they hold.

    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    It may not be an easy task though, but I see how I will be using these resources to do a mini teacher workshop. But how do we over come the challenge of certificates? Our teachers here hold that in high esteem

    in reply to: Reflection 5.1 – Make language your own #4660
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    English has become ours, we speak about us in it, we talk about our relationships and cultures. For example in Nigeria a cousin is called either cousin brother or cousin sister or more so a brother or sister. What I am trying to say is that the language has been made our son.
    The forum I feel students can talk to themselves is more or less through groups and clubs. Many African countries may not have a readily available internet and computer access, as such blogs and all the e forums may not serve the general population. But where they are available they would be of great help

    in reply to: Unit 4 Reflections #4658
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    We all have our individual registers or idiolects as it is. We can’t say that the standard English must be what every individual learner and teachers use, in my classes I try so much to use the plurilithic methods although in many occasions there are clashes with the policy makers and the supervisors coupled with the fact that many of the tests are standard tests derived from the text books. But classroom communication is always done using our own Englishes.

    in reply to: Discussion 4.2 – Testing English #4657
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    There is nothing wrong with teaching the plurilithic way, but how do you test the students having in mind they all have their idiolects and their individual Englishes. As much as this is concern this may be a challenge for me.
    Another thing is how to convince the policy makers and other supervisors that what you are doing is the best. Or in some cases when the tests are standard.

    in reply to: Reflection 4.2 – Classroom Activities #4654
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    I didn’t not fully realize that I use the plurilithic methods of teaching until I started this course. I use the individual, pair, groups and plenary method in many cases and for me it’s been working. Hardly do I rely on text books, but mostly on personally prepared material

    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    In many occasions the syllabus is designed without these varieties of teaching and learning methods. The syllabus is designed that some monolithically designed text must be used.

    in reply to: Discussion 4.1 – Classroom ideas and experiences #4583
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    Games and role play allows many of the students to feel free and flexible, they may not be so shy to express themselves. Reinforcement does help in many occasions. I am talking in relation to speaking activities.

    in reply to: Unit 3 Reflections #4581
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    I believe that the outside class should be brought into the classroom, this reduces the stiffness that monolithic concept encourages. If the learning is made flexible, and use of the language as well without some precriptive rules.

    in reply to: Unit 3 Reflections #4579
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    I can’t agree less with your acceptance of the concept of ‘proficiency’ by Widdowson. It is your expressive ability that determines your proficiency not adherence to some kind of precriptive rules.
    I also believe that the outside class use of the language should be brought to the class as well. It reduces the stiffness of the learning. We can expose learners to different context of usage rather than the monolithic stiffness.

    in reply to: Reflection 3.2 – ‘Learning/teaching cultures’ #4576
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    The prestige accorded the speakers of what is seen to look like ‘standard’ English in Nigeria is a cultural factor. There was a time if a politician does not sound to be speaking ‘educated’ English he may not win the people. Politicians may speak in lingo that only them may understand and the people may hail them for being brains.

    in reply to: Discussion 3.2 – Factors that shape the learning of English #4575
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    The reason for learning the English language itself is a factor

    in reply to: Discussion 3.1 – Places & Contexts of English Exposure #4573
    Dauda PikawiDauda Pikawi
    Member

    The experience of another English by learners and even myself ouside the ‘formal’ sources like text books, teachers and tests is diverse. It is much more than the above mentioned formal sources:
    The church
    The internet
    The movie
    The television
    The social media
    The music
    The friends with diverse world view
    Even listening to other subjects teachers
    The market
    Just mentioning a few in my Nigerian case.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)